Political Canadiana October 3–10, 2019

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Some of the most interesting political and historical Canadiana for October 3–10, 2019.

The most important story of the last week or so in the election is the sickening threats against Justin Trudeau, which forced him to wear a bulletproof vest at a Liberal campaign rally.

  • CBC News summarizes the story.
  • John Ivison writes for the National Post about the need for zero tolerance towards threats towards political leaders.
  • Andrew Scheer and Jagmeet Singh both tweeted their support of Trudeau and their disgust with the threats against him.

The federal leaders’ debate took place on October 7:

  • Paul Wells writes for Macleans about his review of the English leaders’ debate that all the major federal leaders, including Maxime Bernier and Yves-Francois Blanchet, attended.
  • Rex Murphy writes for the National Post to pan the debate, criticizing everything from the messy format to its inability to discuss the country’s most pressing issues.
  • Spencer Fernando writes for the Post Millennial about how military spending and defence should have been discussed during the leaders’ debate.
  • The editors of the Counterweights blog review the debate, saying that all the federal leaders held their own.
  • Marco Vigliotti writes for IPolitics about five takeaways from the debate.
  • Ania Bessonov writes for the CBC about the ‘dos and don’ts’ of federal leaders’ debates.
  • Jesse Brown writes for Canadaland about how the Aboriginal Peoples’ Television Network’s efforts to have an Indigenous journalist at the debate were rejected.

Other election news:

  • David Thurton writes for the CBC about Jagmeet Singh’s effort to clarify what he meant by saying Canada was a ‘racist country’.
  • Dale Smith writes for Loonie Politics about why it’s a bad idea for party leaders to dictate the terms of supporting minority or coalition governments before the election is over.
  • Charles Adler writes for Global News about how a strong economy and strong public sector may give the Liberals an edge.
  • Maura Forrest writes for the National Post about the Bloc Quebecois’ rise from its presumed ashes.
  • Jolson Lim writes for IPolitics about Jagmeet Singh’s pledge to spend whatever necessary to end boil water advisories on First Nations reserves.
  • Cam Holmstrom writes on his blog about Singh’s asking the reporter how they would feel if cities like Toronto, Montreal or Edmonton had boil water advisories and if they’d be asking about the costs of fixing the problem.
  • Fatima Syed and Stephanie Wood write for the National Observer about the Indigenous issues being overlooked during the election.
  • Andrew Coyne writes for the National Post about the lack of difference between the Liberal and Conservative platforms.
  • Alan Freeman writes for IPolitics about the federal parties’ ‘over-promising’ and how it leads voters to tune them out.
  • Robert Jago writes for the National Observer about how Indigenous people are being promised the bare minimum in the election.
  • The editors of the Counterweights blog write about the possibility of an Andrew Scheer government.
  • Quito Maggi writes for IPolitics about why the election is still unpredictable.
  • Tamari Kitossa writes for The Conversation about how the election shows many Canadians still don’t understand what it means to be racist.
  • Eric Montigny writes for Policy Options about how the federal parties are making promises that impact provincial jurisdiction.
  • Tim Naumetz writes for IPolitics about the concerns in Alberta over the Liberal promises on hunting rifles and other guns.
  • Yan Campagnolo writes for The Conversation about the issues with Andrew Scheer’s plans to revise Cabinet confidentiality rules.
  • Duncan Cameron writes for Rabble.ca about Andrew Scheer’s difficulty connecting with many voters.
  • Jean-Francois Savard and Mathieu Landriault write for The Conversation about how Indigenous justice and reconciliation are barely on the radar in the election.
  • Dale Smith writes for Loonie Politics about why the election seems so listless.
  • Stephanie Dubois writes for the CBC about why First Nations people are unlikely to vote at the same levels they did in 2015.
  • Jason Markusoff writes for Macleans about the Liberals’ attempts to stave off extinction in Alberta.
  • David Macdonald writes for the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives’ Behind The Numbers blog to analyze the federal parties’ debt promises.
  • Miles Corak writes on his blog to analyze the federal parties’ platforms addressing the changing nature of work, pay and poverty.
  • Tanya Talaga writes for the Toronto Star to analyze the Liberals’ promises to Indigenous people.
  • David Thurton writes about Elizabeth May saying that Canada is awash in ‘systemic racism’.
  • Rachel Aiello writes for CTV News about the Conservatives’ plans to cut spending to balance the budget.
  • Justin Ling writes for Canadaland about how the rumours of a suppressed Globe and Mail story about Justin Trudeau are bullshit.

Other items of interest:

  • Bailey Macabre writes on Medium about the history of Thanksgiving in Canada, how it relates to Indigenous people in Canada and ways Canadians can show gratitude for Indigenous support when Europeans first arrived.
  • Yvonne Su writes for Samara Canada about how she became an active citizen in Canadian politics and public policy.
  • Rick Salutin writes for Rabble.ca about the subtle but important differences between Canadians and Americans, as reflected in current politics.
  • Timothy J. Stanley writes for the ActiveHistory.ca blog about Won Alexander Cumyow’s efforts for Chinese Canadians to have their voting rights recognized in British Columbia and Canada.
  • Rachel A. Snow writes for the Two Row Times about how settler Canadians misunderstand the Treaty relationship with First Nations, and the First Nations perspective of it.
  • Spencer Fernando writes for the Post Millennial about how people living in Canada who support Communist China and harass supports of Hong Kong democracy should go live in China.
  • Heather Scoffield writes for the National Post about the challenge of balancing Canada’s need for oil development revenue and need to fight climate change.
  • Geoff Norquay writes for Policy Options to review the effectiveness of some of Canada’s previous minority governments.
  • The Two Row Times reports on Francois Legault’s apology to Indigenous people in Quebec, saying the provincial government has failed in its responsibilities to them, in responding to the response of the Viens commission on the discrimination faced by Indigenous women in Quebec.
  • Spencer Fernando writes for the Post Millennial about how the winner of the election will face a deeply divided country.
  • Don Forgerson and Bill Karsten write for IPolitics about the costs and urgency of relating to climate change.
  • Andrew Parkin writes for Policy Options about ten public opinion charts that show some divisions in Canada are overstated, while others are reasons for concern.
  • Nahnda Garlow writes for the Two Row Times about how the Liberals’ attempts to appeal the order to compensate First Nations children for the effects of underfunding the child welfare system is a ‘step backwards’ in any attempts to create a new relationship with Indigenous people.
  • Cam Holmstrom writes on his blog about what the Liberals’ decision to appeal the First Nations compensation order says about their commitment to reconciliation.
  • Adrien Cloutier and Eric Montigny write for Policy Options about what the push for provincial autonomy might lead to.
  • Nakuset writes for Ricochet about her efforts to contact Justin Trudeau about her request for funding for an Indigenous housing project in Montreal, and her never receiving a response.
  • Alan Freeman writes for IPolitics about how politics is impacting the development of the equalization formula.
  • Martha Hall Findlay writes for the Canada West Foundation about the efforts of Canadian businesses, including in the Western Canadian energy industry, to reduce their emissions, and urges more businesses to follow suit.
  • Ross Fetterly writes for the Macdonald-Laurier Institute about how Canada’s defence strategy hasn’t adapted to meet an increasingly complex threat environment.
  • Martha Hall Findlay writes for the Canada West Foundation about how Canada risks becoming a ‘nation of hypocrites’ without a serious discussion about energy.
  • Justin Ling writes for the National Post about why Justin Trudeau’s plan for a tunnel between Newfoundland and Labrador is a bad idea, something which Pierre Trudeau recognized.
  • Alan MacEachern writes for the ActiveHistory.ca blog about his digitization experiences at the Rene-Tremblay Building in in Matane, Quebec.
  • Cory Morgan writes on his blog about the need to end corporate welfare.
  • Bob Joseph writes for the Indigenous Corporate Training blog to offer six suggestions for effectively negotiating with Indigenous communities.

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Passionately devoted to Canadian unity. Fascinated by Canadian politics and history. Striving to understand the mysteries of Canada. Publishes every few weeks.

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Jared Milne

Jared Milne

Passionately devoted to Canadian unity. Fascinated by Canadian politics and history. Striving to understand the mysteries of Canada. Publishes every few weeks.

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